Salaries for Jobs in Genetics

Salaries for Jobs in Genetics

by Dr. Hsien-Hsien Lei
Posted September 19, 2007 in Jobs Involving DNA

beaker dr bunsen honeydewEver wonder how much money you could earn working in the field of genetics? Dr. William Vosburgh, project manager for the District of Columbia Consolidated Forensics & Public Health Laboratory, was reportedly being paid more than $230,000. Compare that to the average annual salary of $38,443 for biological science technicians in the Federal Government.

According to myDanwei, “a a pioneer of developing the next generation organization, people, salary, and job information searching and data mining platforms,” here are some current genetics salaries in biotechnology companies:

  • Microarray Software Engineer – $88,400
  • Statistical Genetics Analyst – $85,000
  • Senior Scientist – $95,000
  • Bioinformatics Research Associate – $68,000
  • Bioinformatics Scientist – $88,400
  • Cytogenetic Technologist – $50,320
  • Molecular Genetics clinical Lab Scientist – $59,987
  • Genetic Counselor – $54,600

Here are some more genetics salaries from Indeed.com which pegs the average earnings of someone working in genetics at $57,000.

  • Genetics Counselor – $53,000
  • Research Geneticist – $86,000
  • Molecular Biology Research Associate – $45,000
  • Biotech Technical Writer – $75,000
  • Cytogenetic Technologist – $42,000

Update: Chris Miller gives us the following figures in the comments:

  • Assistant Professor – $54,036
  • Associate Professor – $64,074

Steve Murphy adds:

  • Medical geneticists with MD’s – $90,000 to $125,000

GeeZee gives us these genetics salaries in Malaysia:

  • Bioinformatics Scientist – $15,000
  • Bioinformatics Research Officer – $8,000
  • Bioinformatics Software Developer – $9,000

adamB also in Malaysia tells us:

  • Junior Bioinformatician – $6,900

What do you think? Do these salaries make you want to join the genetics work force?

HT: My sister

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(87 comments)


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87 Comments

Comment by NA Subscribed to comments via email

Not if I wanted to become rich or have one of the most prestigious jobs in society. Genetics is one of those fields that you really can’t make a lot of money doing. A nurse can pull in more then a genetic counselor in most areas of the country. The salary for a speech pathologist is in the same area as a genetic counselors salary is. Some 2 year tech degrees can put a person at close to the same salary as some of the lower end salaries in the genetics field.

I don’t care how much money I make as long as I’m able to pay the bills every month. I chose to go down the trail for a career in the field of genetics because I love learning about birth defects, teratology, genetic testing, genetic diseases/syndromes, helping those out that have a genetic condition, and love and fascination for how genotype relates to phenotype.

For my senior seminar, which is in a couple of weeks, I will be presenting a speech on the Clinical Outcome of Breast Cancer Patients with BRCA1/BRCA2 Mutation Status.

My background information is going to deal with how BRCA mutations lead to breast cancer, founder mutations of BRCA in several ethnic groups, identify genetic testing (deal with sensitivity and so forth), and talk about treatment options. Then I will be analyzing two research papers for the methods, results, and discussion. I will relate this who seminar in how it can advance the field of genetic counseling.

I’m thinking about getting the seminar audio taped and see if I want it shared on the internet.

NA, Your senior seminar sounds like it’s going to be amazing. If you get it audio/videotaped and put it online, let me know so I can tell everyone here. :)

 
Comment by Sandra F. Subscribed to comments via email

Well, I want to say that I myself am also very interested in a career in the field of genetics, and I believe that many genetic disorders and viruses could somehow be linked.

Overall, I feel that the salary for people working in the field of research for genetics, as well as those working in the field of genetic counseling do not get paid nearly well enough for what they do.

Sandra, Thanks for your comment! There’s definitely a salary disparity in the US. Just thinking of what celebrities get paid as compared to teachers is enough to get my blood simmering….

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Comment by Jay Subscribed to comments via email

Hi, would you know what kind of jobs in genetics or biotechnology are there to pursue with just a BSc education level?? What are there salaries?
Is it necessary to have a MSc or PHD to get a decent and well paying job?

 
 
Comment by Chris

Two more for the list:
Assistant Professor: $54,036
Associate Professor: $64,074

Gee, I wonder why academic researchers are jumping ship to go to industry. The hours are better, the job prospects are better, and the pay is significantly better. Not a tough call for lots of folks.

Yeah, those are base salaries too not including other perks. Although I have friends in academia and I can understand the appeal. If you’re at a good university, the sense of community and intellectual stimulation is hard to beat.

 
 
Comment by Berci Meskó

Just a note: in the US! We could never dream about such salaries here in Hungary in these fields.

Anyway, this one seems to be perfect for me: Research Geneticist – $86,000

:)

But Berci, the cost of living in Hungary is much lower too!

Comment by Beth Long Subscribed to comments via email

Hi, I am an American who lives in Hungary, and can say that is only partially true.

Housing costs are significantly less, and there is no property tax (though that is being proposed), but all consumer goods (electronics, clothing, etc.) are a lot more expensive than in the U.S. Gasoline is more than double the U.S. price. Public transportation costs are on a par with those in the U.S.

I am working on a Y-DNA project of the Bukovina Szekely people, if that is of interest to any of you. You can check out the project website which is posted above.

Beth Long

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Thanks for the added insight, Beth! After living in Japan for 5 years and now London, I can say that the cost of living in the US is actually quite reasonable!

 
 
Comment by Starbuck

Are you joking? The cost of living in Hungary is much lower? I dont think so… Have you ever live in Hungary? Half of my salary goes to tax. The salary is 3-4 times higher (or more) in USA and Western Europa, but the cost of living not lower the same rate in Hungary.

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Comment by jhay

Pretty attractive pay there for geneticists. But it takes a way lot more effort to become one. Nonetheless, the future is in their hands so to speak.

I think the salaries listed above are fairly reasonable. Genetic counselors have master’s degrees that are typically two-year degrees. I think it’s worth it. Maybe I should go back to school…. ;)

Comment by Regina

I am interested in becoming a Genetic Counsellor. I am a pediatrician and as part of our training we were exposed to a considerable work of counselling. Can this be enough to qualify me for a job? I’d be willing to undergo further training. Would you guys know how much would be the average pay og genetic counsellors in New Zealand. Thanks a lot.

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Comment by Eric

Compared the to “average American” salary, those numbers are pretty good. However, compared to other industries (finance for example) they are paltry. I”m not a geneticist, but I am an assistant professor and for me, the trade off on salary for academia is a good one. However, I do realize that to make any real money I will have to be a little entrepreneurial in my out of work activities. On the whole salaries should be more commensurate with the knowledge base required to perform those jobs.

Hi Eric, Thanks for the comment. If I recall correctly, many full professors earn side money by giving lectures, sitting on boards, and whatnot. I’ve also heard that more prestigious universities pay faculty less because the prestige is supposed to make up for it…help them get outside gigs and all that. I guess it all evens out in the end?

 
 
Comment by Lil

i am glad then i’m grad student in bioinformatics/genetics… now all i have to do is actually be good at what i do and graduate.. ;)

Lil, How did I miss that you’re a grad student! How much longer till you graduate and what are your plans?

Comment by Lil

well, maybe because i don’t tend to talk about work outside the lab much ;)

fingers crossed i’ll be graduating in the next year. plans right now? it’s all a little sketchy and i’m playing it by ears. :)

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Comment by maggi

hi, i m also a student of human genetics in india . i want to know sm gud institutes for studying genetic counseling can u suggest me sm, n couid u tell me how to ask a questoin here in this forum

 
Comment by Gauri Subscribed to comments via email

Hi Lil,
Since you are a graduate student.I felt like asking this question to you. I am applying for Ph.D program and I am really confused about which field to choose. Being an international student, I do not really know what fields are “top-notch”. My idea was to do it in either Medical genetics or Molecular biology. I have a Masters in Microbiology(not a US degree) I was more interested in knowing what kind of jobs do you get after you complete the Ph.D program.
I tried to surf on the net but no satisfactory answers so far.

 
 
Comment by StevenMurphy MD Subscribed to comments via email

Ok,
So what’s the deal….Where are the MD geneticists salaries? The answer…90-125k USD. What about another medical specialist? 180-400k USD. What about medical school debt….an average of 140k USD. It is a no brainer as to why all medical students aspire to become radiologists….starting salaries often top 400k USD.
Sad But True
-Steve
http://www.thegenesherpa.blogspot.com

Thanks, Steve! I’ve added those figures above.

If I ever went to med school, I think I’d like to be a pathologist. :)

 
Comment by Geralyn Subscribed to comments via email

Oh please…PhDs spend as long if not longer than MDs and the chance of raking in that kind of money is minimal. Not to mention all of the extra grant funding available to MDs despite the fact they went into medicine and not research in the first place. Sorry, but no sympathy from this immuno-geneticist…

Thanks for the comment, Geralyn. Sometimes I’m too polite for my own good. :P

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Comment by Jerene

Hello there. I have a masters in medical genetics and thoroughly confused when it comes to “what next” i love genetic counseling as a job, coz i have a years training in it n on the other hand clinical research mangement (only fr thr pay). What do u think i must do nxt. apply fr my 2 year masters fr the genetic counseling prog in NY or go into the management field coz of the better pay? help!!!!

 
 
 
 
Comment by GeeZee Subscribed to comments via email

This is great info especially for those of us outside the USA. Here in Malaysia one can usually expect:

Bioinformatics Scientist – $15,000

Bioinformatics research officer – $8,000

Bioinformatic Sofware developer – $9,000

For expatriates it can be two to three times more than the listing above, but still not as high as one might expect in the US. In all fairness though the cost of living is about 3 times lower than the US. It still makes sense to do development here if you can attract the right people and keep them happy :)

 
Comment by adamB Subscribed to comments via email

Junior bioinformatician gets less than that, we’re getting around $6900/yr. That’s before they minus for other things (not sure of the details)… leaving us with less than $6000/yr… *sigh*

 
Comment by GeeZee Subscribed to comments via email

OMG, AdamB, looks like an internship in a US sequencing center will earn you more, not to mention better experience.

 

Thank you, GeeZee and Adam, for the numbers! I’ve added them to the post.

Comment by adamB Subscribed to comments via email

Yes I’m from Malaysia. Though now I’m seriously thinking to move to somewhere else with better pay.

But if you leave Malaysia, where will you go for all that yummy food?

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Comment by adamB Subscribed to comments via email

Yeah the food is good. :) Can’t get it anywhere else in the world. *sigh*

 
 
 
 
Comment by pezzaz Subscribed to comments via email

Well, with that amount of pay.. perhaps we can import the local food (am also in Malaysia)

Pezzaz, You might have some money left over after paying off your $25,000 car, $500,000 house,…. ;)

 
 
Comment by GeeZee Subscribed to comments via email

AdamB, I think you should be on another blog looking for better job prospects. In Singapore the pay is much better than Malaysia.
I had a friend in National University of Singapore NUS who worked with a genomics group. He was earning about 2.5 times that of the bioinformatics position, but he had about an 85% housing subsidy and the option for Permanent Residency. Singapore has more structure in place to look after their professional workers, and biotechnology is one of their key target areas. I have seen at least 4 major US Universities open research groups at the Biopolis in Singapore.

Hey GeeZee! Don’t be kicking Adam out of here. I’m enjoying his company. ;)

Singapore is certainly a very attractive place to be right now in terms genomics. I have personal ties there myself and will probably live there at some point. On the other hand, all countries need genetics experts so I hope Malaysia will be able to compensate everyone adequately as according to the cost of living!

Comment by adamB Subscribed to comments via email

Thanks GeeZee for the info. :)

The same feeling here Dr Lei. I hope they will compensate everyone adequately and fairly but sadly the scene here is I’m a nobody unless I get a PhD. So it’s either I have to go get a job somewhere else or do my PhD.

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I have noticed that Asian countries have a hang-up about the PhD/MD thing. PhD’s and MD’s in the US/UK are a dime a dozen. haa

 
 
 
 
Comment by GeeZee Subscribed to comments via email

I agree with Adam on the PhD thing. People dont respect you if you don’t have a PhD. I’m also considering a move back to school because of this.
It plays more of a role when you’re trying to build or run an organization in these developing countries.
Malaysia plans to establish at least 20 new biotech companies by 2020, however they cannot do it with the current crop of local graduates. Due to the difficulties faced in terms of obtaining permanent residency and tax benefits, it’s not making it any more attractive for foreigners considering moving here.
The incentives and packages for these skilled workers need to be more tailored to keeping these people around to disseminate their skill locally and sustain that for the 2020 vision to happen.

“It plays more of a role when you’re trying to build or run an organization in these developing countries.”

Great point, GeeZee. Just out of curiosity, is the Malaysian government funding students to go abroad for school so that they can return to educate others?

 
 
Comment by GeeZee Subscribed to comments via email

The Malaysian government does have programs to educate Malaysians abroad. These are mostly available in the US and UK and cover engineering fields most of the time. There are 1 or two programs I am aware of that train Malaysians in Biotechnology in the Bay Area, San Francisco. It’s a joint effort by UCSF, Berkeley and Caltech if I am not mistaken. The main body that deals with these sort of things is the newly formed Biotech Corporation, which is commissioned by the Malaysian Ministry of Science and Technology.

Thanks for filling me in, GeeZee. Sounds like the biotech situation in Malaysia is promising.

 
 
Comment by Lil

oh dear, it’s scaring me to read how little pay you get in malaysia for the work that’s challenging and highly regarded elsewhere… 6K per annum is less than my grad student stipend and we’re not even talking about currency conversion! this will really makes me think a gazillion times should i ever consider moving home (yes, i’m malaysian too)…

Lil, I wouldn’t worry about it too much but keep your options open should you want to return to Malaysia. You’ll have a valuable overseas degree to show off!

 
 
Comment by sparks Subscribed to comments via email

US$ comparison isn’t everything. Lunch in Malaysia cost 5 or 6 RM, in US cost $5 for a sandwich. 3 or 4 times the price. In Malaysia u can buy a home of RM200K try buying a US home for $50K
Local malays compare their wage to expat but expat can’t send their kids to local school so need to pay high international school fees, higher tax, less benefits. Also some of you guys are learning a bit from the expats and maybe wouldn’t have jobs if expats wasn’t here.
Is your glass half full or half empty? If its half-full work harder and smarter until its full. If its half-empty sit back and watch it all slowly evaporate away.

Sparks, Thanks for the comment. I don’t know if the other guys were complaining as much as just pointing out the facts.

 
 
Comment by Mel

“6K per annum is less than my grad student stipend and we’re not even talking about currency conversion!”

Not talking about currency conversion and you get more than 60k a year? that means you get stipend of more than 5k a month? in what currency. USD? GBP? quite impossible..

“People dont respect you if you don’t have a PhD. I’m also considering a move back to school because of this.”

Studying PhD is not about wanting to gain respect from the others. You can earn respect even without the title.

 
Comment by Mel

From what I heard, a general stipend in the UK ranged from only between 5k-20k a year.

 
Comment by Gee-Zee Subscribed to comments via email

Mel, 6K USD amounts to about RM24K here, and that’s what the take home salary for local bioinformatics people here. Remember as well that the cost of living in Malaysia is about 3 times less than the US.

About the Phd. People who don’t know any better see a PhD as some sort of level of proficiency in a particular field. If one has years of experience and a proven track record then that does add significant weight but otherwise there is no point of reference for employers.
In my experience it matters less in the corporate setting whether you have a Phd or not. You’ll obviously be more expensive to employers if you have a PhD. In some academic groups a PhD is almost mandatory if you’re going to be writing grant proposals/renewals and leading particular research projects.

A PhD should be about research and about contributing to the community. In the real world people use it to their advantage for career advancement. The field of Genetics is no exception to this rule.

Comment by Finn

Nice blog.
The salary suggestions haven’t touched upon many ancillary jobs available to genetics graduates in sales, marketing and distribution in diagnostics or or biomedical field.
To the Malaysian based graduates: I work in Taiwan, if you speak Chinese you could probably find a position in Taiwan also. The pay would be better here (although also low compared to US/Europe).

 
 
Comment by Roger DiPaolo

From personal experience I can say that the salaries you show here for the US are very low and most likely acquired from those who have a vested interest in showing the low-end of the scale. I worked as a “Microarray Software Engineer” from 2001 to 2006 making about 75% more than your figure as base salary alone – and in our organization I wasn’t close to being alone at that salary level. I personally worked with many other engineers in both software and hardware engineering who were making in the high $100’s, closer to $200K, per year base salary. Not to count just that, but generous performance bonuses were paid out in addition to the base.
Granted, this was in the greater Boston area, which is traditionally a high-priced market anyway as it is without a doubt the east-coast equivalent of Silicon Valley (BTW, Company Headquarters was in Silicon Valley – they used to be a “bi-coastal” company until last year). Still in 2008, even in a slightly “down” economy, the very best “Microarray Software Engineers” can still easily command salaries in excess of $200K per year – and a lucky few much better even than that.

Roger, Thanks for the figures. I’m guessing software engineers can earn a great deal more than lowly lab techs or even genetic counselors. For those who are able, I’ve always thought bioinformatics and software engineering are two very good career choices.

 
 
Comment by Wilson Subscribed to comments via email

I must say that having graduated with a B.A. in genetics since May/07 it has been hard for me to find a job. I live in NJ where most of the big pharmaceutical companies are and there is currently no jobs for geneticist. I don’t know if its because of the current economy or that genetics is not as popular a field as say a chemist in this country.

Wilson, I’m sorry to hear that it’s been difficult for you to find a job. In terms of career advice, I think networking is the way to go. Could you tap any of your former professors for potential opportunities? You can also set-up informational interviews at companies/labs of interest just to gauge what skills you need to land a satisfactory job. Good luck!

 
 
Comment by Dr John Michael Nahay

I seriously hope that none of you takes stats on salaries seriously. Facts:
1) there are no paid jobs in the world anymore -
with the exception of socialist countries. The only way to get paid for one’s work to improve the lives of humans and animals – either by curing disease or freeing them from prison or redistributing wealth – is for governments to force the populace to pay them, to mandate that they obey socialist laws.

If you don’t like being taxed, then instead focus
on laws that go after consumers – whether individual consumers or corporations and businesses
- and outlaw them spending money on products
which murder and torture (meat, fur) or destroy the environment and cost millions unnecessarily in waste due to shoddy design and manufacturing
(Ford cars, GM cars), the same way americans force laws on consumers who wish to exercise their free choice to buy drugs from Cuba or Canada or to buy marijuana or heroin or cocaine for personal consumption.

Only after all laws are fair will costs come down, wealth will be re-arranged, and useful, meaningful
jobs will be created.
Until then, I and no one else has to be forced to
obey laws written by members of political parties
we don’t support, such as property-rights laws
of corporations and businesses.

2) Salary stats are worthless. Proof: “the average
salary of such-and-such manager of genetics is
$80,000″. But, there exists only ONE person in the
entire world who is such-and-such manager of genetics! So, the average salary is $80,000.
Meanwhile, 40,000 individuals who can do that job
just as well are left unemployed.

Another example: “the average salary of late-night
talk show hosts is $20,000,000″. And, exactly 3
persons have this job (David Letterman, Jay Leno,
Conan O’Brien). Again, 40,000 individuals who can do that job just as well are left unemployed.

The bottom line: 99.999% of all humans -
and hence businesses – are too stupid to know the consequences of their actions, of the actions of others, of their laws, and of what they spend their money on. The only way for them to learn these consequences is to be forced to
mathematically model these consequences via game theoretic models.

Comment by maria Subscribed to comments via email

who screwed you over, Dr. Nahay?

 
 
Comment by dbm24 Subscribed to comments via email

I have led large and small life sciences companies. We hired sales reps with PhD and MSc degrees in molecular biology starting at $50K, and going up to $110 K base salary. When you add on commission plans (which are designed so that 50% of your sales force hit them), the take home salary has been between $60K, and $150K. In some cases, reps can hit into the low $200,000, but that just means we didn’t do our job in forecasting sales appropriately.

 
Comment by Kris Subscribed to comments via email

Hi, I’m from British Columbia, Canada, and I am interested in specializing in the area of genetics. I’ve always had a fascination with genetics because there is so much yet to learn about it and apply to people’s everyday lives. However, the one aspect about genetics that worries me is the amount of job opportunities. Is the area of genetics an almost secluded area of work where there a few job openings? Or is it growing at a reasonable pace where jobs are continuously opening?

Comment by dbm24 Subscribed to comments via email

I would have to say BC is a growing area of genetic research. Now you have to remember that we are still in the discovery phase, and are still working towards building applications that will drive opportunities in the mass marketplace. That will take some time, but we are already seeing a convergence between art, history, and genetics. It’s quite interesting.

 
Comment by johnsonville

Hi Kris,
I would say that you would have much more opportunities in Ontario if you plan to stay in Canada to work. I have a BSc and MSc in Bioinformatics, and just landed a bioinformatician job at a research center here for 60k a year.

Comment by Jay Subscribed to comments via email

Hi,
I’m an university undergraduate in Ontario pursuing a bachelor of science degree and I am interested in specializing in the area of genetics. Would you know what kind of jobs in genetics or biotechnology are there to pursue with just a BSc education level?? What are there salaries?
Is it necessary to have a MSc or PHD to get a decent and well paying job?

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Comment by dbm24 Subscribed to comments via email

Hi Jay

It all depends on your definition of a decent well playing job. Your chances of landing a 6 figure salary in 5-10 years is much higher with a graduate degree than with a BSc. Graduate degrees, in general, teach you how to become researchers. So here your choices are limited to becoming a professor, or if the “professor lottery” doesn’t go in your favour, you become a research technician, or clinical scientist…something where you are not the boss. Here, you can expect to top out at $85K in Canada (on average…there are some that are in six figures)…but this takes a long time.

If you go outside this normal route, and bring some business skills, you have more opportunities. Again, a graduate degree will absolutely help more here.

A lot of this depends on your personality (are you outgoing?, do you play team sports, or if you’re not into sports, do you team-based activities like choir/band, etc. Much of what you learn at a BSc level is not so much skills, but book knowledge. A graduate degree will put that knowledge into action. Once you’ve completed that, you will need to find a way to differentiate yourself from the other 1,000 graduate students that graduate with a genetics degree every year in North America.

Anyone can do it. You need to set a goal, determine your path, and keep evaluating both your goal and your path.

 
 
 
 
Comment by stark

“GeeZee gives us these genetics salaries in Malaysia:

* Bioinformatics Scientist – $15,000
* Bioinformatics Research Officer – $8,000
* Bioinformatics Software Developer – $9,000

adamB also in Malaysia tells us:

* Junior Bioinformatician – $6,900″

These salaries are per month or year?
All in RM??

 
Comment by Susan Subscribed to comments via email

Hi Guys! This is a great site, just stumbled across it. Im hoping someone can help me out if ye dont mind. I have a BSc. in Biochem and an MSc. in Forensic Genetics. Im Irish, and at present Im working in a DNA sequencing facility in Australia but I really want to get into a more forensic/genetic research field in Canada. Does anybody have any suggestions, whereabouts in Canada are the most Molecular Biology based jobs? Cheers for all your help!! I should probably get a Bioinformatics degree, it is the way of the future! :)

 
Comment by dbm24 Subscribed to comments via email

Three main cities, Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver….probably in that order. However, Edmonton and Calgary are booming because of all the oil money. Other cities would be Guelph, Hamilton, London, Ottawa, Halifax, Saskatoon, and Winnipeg. All have good Universitites, with spin-offs into various fields. For Forensics, the top three are probably your safest bet.

 
Comment by Susan Subscribed to comments via email

Cheers dbm24, thanks a mill for that, I’ll go on the hunt in these areas so! :)

 
Comment by Gauri Subscribed to comments via email

Hi all,
Since you are a graduate student.I felt like asking this question to you. I am applying for Ph.D program and I am really confused about which field to choose. Being an international student, I do not really know what fields are “top-notch”. My idea was to do it in either Medical genetics or Molecular biology. I have a Masters in Microbiology(not a US degree) I was more interested in knowing what kind of jobs do you get after you complete the Ph.D program.
I tried to surf on the net but no satisfactory answers so far.

 
Comment by Gauri Subscribed to comments via email

Hi all,
I am applying for Ph.D program and I am really confused about which field to choose. Being an international student, I do not really know what fields are “top-notch”. My idea was to do it in either Medical genetics or Molecular biology. I have a Masters in Microbiology(not a US degree) I was more interested in knowing what kind of jobs do you get after you complete the Ph.D program.
I tried to surf on the net but no satisfactory answers so far.
I planned for a Masters degree first but unfortunately there are no funded Masters programs in my school.
I am looking for a base salary of 50-60K.

 
Comment by Gauri Subscribed to comments via email

Hi All,
I am an international student located in Oregon(USA). I am planning to make a career in Genetics/molecular biology. I have a Masters degree in Microbiology from my country.
I plan to do either Masters or Ph.D.
I would like to work as a Research Scientist in Biotech/pharma companies.
However I do not know which fields are “top notch” and would end me with a reasonable job a base salary of 45-60K.
My plan is to apply for a Ph.D in Medical genetics or Molecular biology.
I am already 30 yrs of age and therefore a little hesitant to apply for Ph.D as it will take me another 5-6 yrs to graduation.I have no experience of working in United States and no industry experience in my country. I used to work as a part time lecturer teaching microbioloy to bachelor level students. Will these factors affect my resume?

 
 
Comment by sandeep

hi, i am sandeep kasbe from pune university ,now i have enrolled in msc in genetics , so tell me the prospects in genetics & salary & morev important which country has more job opening.

Comment by Jerene

graduating in genetics as such might be just the first step. u could either enter the research field or take up to management in clinical research. There are loads to do in this wonderful field. Hardwork and dedication. n if salary aint too important u’ll find ure soul at peace

 
 
Comment by sandeep

hi ,i am sandeep kasbe from india ,currently i am doing msc in genetics ,tell me the prospecrs in genetics ,salary & which country has better jobs available.

 
Comment by anjie Subscribed to comments via email

hi, i stumbled across this page and i can’t help but to comment and share…i am a pediatrician in the philippines. i am planning to pursue fellowship training in genetics. i am thinking of training in either australia or singapore. i know i will need to take AMC and IELTS for me to train in Australia. I read some of the comments posted here and i am compeled to share my passion in Genetics. It was always a dream for me to be a geneticist,not so much for money, but i really want to help patients (and their families) with rare diseases. I was inspired by a clinical geneticist in my country (where we only have around 6 at this time). I really want to pursue my dream. Can anyone help me if you know of easier ways on how to go about it in singapore. like, if it easier to work there first as a researcher or anything for me to have a better chance of admission. i am willing to work and train. I have read that the competition is tough in singapore.

and if in Australia, read that i need to take AMC and IELTS first. Some have suggested that it would be better for me to apply as a registrar first…easier they say than go straight to fellowship because it is difficult to get fellowship, whic i think is true..have written some institutions with genetics training and I guess the competetion is really tough….

thank you so much for reading my loooooooooooooooong comment…hope to hear from you really soon. Blessings from the Philippines!!!

 
Comment by anjie Subscribed to comments via email

i stumbled upon this page and i was really amazed. didn’t know many there are plenty of people with fascination and passion for genetics as I have. I am a pediatrician here in the Philippines and I plan to take pursue a fellowship in clinical genetics (or if available cancer genetics). Genetics has always been my passion since my med school. Can any one of you help me? I plan to train in either Australia or Singapore. Have read about the requirements on both countries. I will need to take AMC before I can train in Australia. I also learned that they have revised guidelines for internation medical graduates. I have heard suggestions of trying out first on being admitted as a registrar but I know that will take time…And in singapore, they have a cut off age 35 (i’m now 33) and you need to apply for atleast a year before the start of training…I also heard that the competition in both countries is tougher nowadays…

Can you suggest of ways for me on how to go about in my application. And would you suggest that I work first in Singapore (example, as a researcher) there for me to get a better chance of getting in… i hope i have the right questions…oh, I just want some good advice on the matter!
Blessings from the Philippines!!!

 
Comment by anjie Subscribed to comments via email

i stumbled upon this page and i was really amazed. didn’t know there are plenty of people with fascination and passion for genetics as I have. I am a pediatrician here in the Philippines and I plan to take pursue a fellowship in clinical genetics (or if available cancer genetics). Genetics has always been my passion since my med school. Can any one of you help me? I plan to train in either Australia or Singapore. Have read about the requirements on both countries. I will need to take AMC before I can train in Australia. I also learned that they have revised guidelines for internation medical graduates. I have heard suggestions of trying out first on being admitted as a registrar but I know that will take time…And in singapore, they have a cut off age 35 (i’m now 33) and you need to apply for atleast a year before the start of training…I also heard that the competition in both countries is tougher nowadays…

Can you suggest of ways for me on how to go about in my application. And would you suggest that I work first in Singapore (example, as a researcher) there for me to get a better chance of getting in… i hope i have the right questions…oh, I just want some good advice on the matter!
Blessings from the Philippines!!!

 
Comment by Wisetintin Subscribed to comments via email

Hi everyone,
what is the job prospect for someone with MSC in crop biotechnology, and which country is the best bet for that type of course? Also, guys from malaysia, is MUST university a good private uni?

 
Comment by Confused

It took me forever to decide on a career choice, but after finishing Biology 30, I decided that genetics is the way to go. It was my favorite unit in Bio 30, and happened to be the one I did best on.
The only unfortunate part was that i have to take Chemistry 30 to get into a Biology class at the university. So now I’m going to be stuck in summer school and upgrading to be able to be in the program. I really hope its worth it.

 
Comment by IELTS Preparation Subscribed to comments via email

Is job in Genetic still have a future in the next 15 years?

 
Comment by ImfrknAWESOME

Hello All :)

I stumbled across your blog after searching for more information about genetics on the web and I must say that I found it very HELPFUL and INFORMATIVE. I recently graduated with a BS-Biology in May of 2008 and decided to take a year off to do research and gain more lab experience before applying to graduate school (either to pursue DVM or a PhD in genetics…I know..complete opposites)..anywho currently I am working @ a University in the Genetics Center doing research and I love it. But my question is about the future of genetics. IF I do decide to pursue a Ph D are there any particular specialty areas of genetics that will have a high demand within the next 5-10 yrs????

 
Comment by Salil Subscribed to comments via email

Hey
I’m currently going to enroll for a MS in Molecular Genetics degree in Uni of Leicester.I am really interested in Gene therapy and cancer genetics.I was wondering what specialisation should i undertake for my PhD?What will be my career prospects after that?

Thanks in advance.

 
Comment by P.Manikantan

hello my friends,

currently i am doing PhD in human molecular genetics especially in neurological disorder “schizophrenia”. i would like to work in hospital or reserch institution. If there any carrer opportunity in any country ?

 
Comment by s.islam Subscribed to comments via email

hey,i currently going to tak admission in McGill uni,i really interested to do MS in molecular genetics or medicinal biotechnology,i m intrested in gene thearay for cancer treatment.i want ur sugesstion what will b my future benefits?

thankx for ur sugesstion in advanced

 
Comment by s.islam Subscribed to comments via email

hey,i m going to tak admission in McGILL uni,i m really intrested in molecular genetics n medicinal biotechnology for gene therapy.what will b my future benefits?give me sugesstion

thnkx in advance

 
Comment by braydon Subscribed to comments via email

Hey everyone!

I am a senior in high school and am getting ready to apply for college. I’ve known since my freshman year that I want to go into a career in genetics. I just wanted to say that all these comments are fantsatic and have opened my eyes to what kind of things genetics has to offer. Maybe I will be able to post things that are as informative as some of the things you guys have said in 10-15 years. Thanks for all the information again and I hope al your careers are going well

 

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